Nostalgia City Mysteries

By Mark S. Bacon

About mbaconauthor

Mystery writer and journalist; former newspaper police reporter.

Summer reads full of murder, suspense & death

2
Skin of Tattoos
Christina Hoag
266 pages
Martin Brown Publishers, LLC  – Aug. 2016
Kindle $2.99  Trade paperback $12.95

When Cyco Lokos gang member Magdaleno (Mags) Argueta comes home to Los Angeles after serving prison time for a robbery, he wants nothing more than to start a new life. But there’s one obstacle: his old life.

Although he was framed by Rico, the new leader of the Cyco Lokos, Mags tries to let go of his bitterness and stay out of gang life for the sake of his Salvadoran immigrant family and his girlfriend Paloma.  But trying to integrate into society after a stint in prison doesn’t come easily.

Faced with low job prospects and Rico’s demands to help the Cyco Lokos make money, a broke and disillusioned Mags makes the only choice he can.  He soon discovers, however, that being a part of the Cyco Lokos with Rico in charge is far more dangerous than it used to be. Loyalties have shifted, including his own.  With his sister pregnant by a rival gang member and his own relationship with Paloma, his best friend’s sister, a violation of gang code, Mags becomes caught in a web of secrets, revenge, lies, and murder that might ultimately cost him everything.


Christina Hoag is a former staff writer for the Miami Herald and the Associated Press.  Her background is appropriate for a gang crime story.  As a journalist she was threatened by a killer’s girlfriend, had her laptop searched by Colombian guerrillas and phone tapped in Venezuela, was suspected of drug trafficking in Guyana, hid under a car to evade Guatemalan soldiers, and posed as a nun to get inside a Caracas jail. Visit her at www.christinahoag.com

 

The Art of Fear (Little Things That Kill)
Pamela Crane
255 pages
Tabella House – July 2017
Kindle 99 cents  Trade paperback $12.99

A terrifying tale of small-town secrets and murder mark’s Pamela Crane’s new thriller. The author of several award-winning series offers puzzles surrounding an accident and suicide—or was murder involved?

Ari Wilburn’s life ended long ago—the day she watched her little sister die in a tragic accident and did nothing to stop it. Crippled with self-blame and resented by her parents, she stumbles through life … and onto an unexpected clue that casts doubt on whether the death was accidental.

Now a psychological wreck, Ari joins a suicide support group where she meets Tina, a sex-enslaved escapee who finds her long-lost father dead. Suicide, police ruled it. But Tina suspects foul play. As a bond develops between the women in their shared loss, they’re dragged into playing a dangerous game with a killer.

Faced with Continue Reading →

New mystery & suspense for summer reads

0
Storm Shelter
Dr. Jennifer Delozier
WiDo Publishing, June 2017
Paperback $14.47  Kindle $4.99

Dept. of Veterans Affairs psychologist Dr. Persephone Smith is assigned to assist survivors of a massive hurricane.  Trapped by a howling storm in an abandoned aircraft hangar, Dr. Smith must become counselor and detective when the evacuees and staff start disappearing—then reappearing as mutilated corpses.

Readers of Storm Shelter learn that Dr. Smith has a unique genetic gift of enhanced empathy allowing her to feel, on a primal level, the emotions of others.  This helps with her job as a counselor, but the gift comes with a price. Plagued by nightmares and insecurity, she absorbs the suffering of her patients by day and swills tequila by night.

When trapped in the hangar by the storm, emotions run wild and the survivors descend into paranoia and madness challenging Dr. Smith on many levels.

Dr. Jennifer Delozier has practiced medicine for 23 years.  She spent the early part of her career as a rural family doctor and then later as a government physician, caring for America’s veterans. She continues to practice medicine and lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and four rescue cats.  Storm Shelter is a prequel to her first novel, Type & Cross. Visit her at www.jldelozier.com

—————————–

Trained to Serve
Amy Shojai
Kindle Worlds,  May 2017
132 pages
Kindle $1.99

In Any Shojai’s novella, Trained to Serve, Lia Corazon has only three days left to prepare ten-month-old Keiki for the police dog test. There’s more than the dog’s future at stake. Success will save Lia’s dream of rebuilding her North Texas dog kennel. But there’s a killer on the loose and he’ll burn anybody who gets in his way.

When a training exercise takes a deadly turn, Lia sends Keiki to protect a young girl, but who will protect Lia?  Trained to Serve is the second in the Keiki & Lia thriller series. Continue Reading →

Author prepares culinary journey through time in debut novel

2
Guest writer

In her debut work, Melodie Winawer created an historical novel, mystery and love story that transports readers—and her protagonist, neurosurgeon Beatrice Trovato, to fourteenth century Tuscany.  The recipient of a Publishers Weekly starred review, Winawer explains here the variety of early Italian food (and painstaking research) that went into her novel.

Three years into writing The Scribe of Siena, I started to get really hungry.  I’d been spending a lot of time with The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy,  and many of the dishes described there had found their way into the book. I wrote about the food but I hadn’t tasted it, and certainly hadn’t tried to cook it either.  Something essential was missing.

Food is a bridge to understanding the past. It goes straight to the visceral—literally.  To make that sensory connection come alive for myself and for the story, I needed to live it, not just write about it.  Beatrice, my protagonist, contemplates a similar choice when she is forced to choose between medieval and modern life. Read about it or live it? For me, there was an obvious route to living the past: making dinner.

I planned the menu for a month. I sourced ingredients at specialty food stores and online outlets that ship overseas, so not precisely an authentic medieval experience. The spice trade in the 14th century doesn’t compare to Amazon Prime.

I had to test drive a few techniques including making almond milk, an essential medieval Italian ingredient.   Fresh almond milk has no relationship to the carton-packaged liquid at health food stores, and it took me six pounds of raw almonds and two days.

First the almonds had to be blanched in a huge pot of boiling water. (Imagine doing that with only a fireplace and a pot hanging over it).  I dropped a load of nuts in, splashing and scalding myself in the process. Then—uh oh—remove all the almonds rapidly after three minutes. SERIOUSLY? Accomplished, but barely.  Then the next step: “When cool enough to handle, remove skins from almonds.”

Ever tried to make almond milk? People did in medieval Siena. So did the author.

This translated into pinching hundreds of almonds between my fingers until the nuts slipped out of their skins. At first it was awkward; many shot suddenly across the room. Then the rhythm set in.

The steam wafted from the cooling nuts, the sun slanted through the kitchen windows, and I started to feel the long stretch of centuries I’d dropped into.  Hours later I had to soak the nuts, then grind them. (Imagine this without a blender.)  Then I had a milky slurry of  almonds and water to push through a strainer. 

At this point I realized my strainer was seriously inadequate, and I ordered a same-day delivery, heavy duty version on line—a luxury I didn’t share with my medieval predecessors.  But they would probably have started with a better strainer. Continue Reading →

%d bloggers like this: