Nostalgia City Mysteries

By Mark S. Bacon

Category Archives: New story

Mystery flash fiction: 100-word crime story

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Called flash fiction, quick fiction or nano fiction, literature in miniature has been around for decades.  Depending on the author or the editor, flash fiction can be 100 words, 250 words, 55 words, or even six words. Hemingway wrote flash fiction. Although she’s well known as a novelist, Margaret Atwood is also a flash fiction writer. I like the discipline of creating a complete story and finishing with precisely 100 words.

badge-and-gun

Here again is a crime drama in exactly 100 words.  Continue Reading →

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This week’s mystery flash fiction

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Today’s crime flash fiction is perhaps striking the limits of how complex a story you can adequately tell in exactly 100 words. Wish I had maybe ten more, but nevertheless, it works.

Porsche-in-lot

One Jump Ahead of the Police

 Finally got a collar on that car theft ring?”

“Think so, lieutenant.  Suspect’s in interrogation.” 

“How’d you nab him, Burnside?”

“We staked out a stolen Porsche.  Thieves took it but parked it two miles away.  They do that when they think a car might have a LoJack tracking device.”

“They let it sit to see if we show up,” the lieutenant said ,  “then pick it up when they think it’s clear.”

 Burnside nodded.  “Smart, but we’re smarter.”

“Bad news,” said another detective entering Burnside’s office.  “Guy we arrested was homeless.  Got paid fifty bucks to drive it to another location.”

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Continue Reading →

Fast-paced mystery scares, intrigues

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Close Up on Murder – A Spirit Lake Mystery
Linda Townsdin
$2.99 Kindle $12.52 Trade paper
Create Space  262 pages

As an amateur detective, Britt Johansson, a Pulitzer-Prize winning press photographer, is brash, aggressive, occasionally reckless and has the patience of a toddler with ADD. “Following the rules… didn’t always work for me,” she says.

When she stumbles on a gruesome murder in her small hometown of Spirit Lake, Minn., she’s off and running in an absorbing tale that has both unsettling and heart-breaking elements. The first murder scene—not the only one—is so vivid and shocking it puts you on edge. The story then segues into a mystery Close-up-On-Murder-Web-optiinvestigation that could lead to hate crimes or systematic terror. And possibly bad news for Johansson. “I…heard the unmistakable crack of a pump action shotgun behind me.” Author Townsdin provides murderous details sufficient to shock, without bloody, slasher-style prose. A good balance.

Her characters include some typical Scandinavians (this is Minnesota, after all) a batch of scary zealots and a mixed batch of writers encamped in Spirit Lake for a seminar. Johansson’s brother’s restaurant becomes her investigation headquarters and later, her fortress. “Every customer who entered the restaurant looked like a psychopath killer to me,” Johansson says. Continue Reading →

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