Death in Nostalgia City

By Mark S. Bacon

Category Archives: short mystery stories

Mystery flash fiction: 100-word crime story

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Called flash fiction, quick fiction or nano fiction, literature in miniature has been around for decades.  Depending on the author or the editor, flash fiction can be 100 words, 250 words, 55 words, or even six words. Hemingway wrote flash fiction. Although she’s well known as a novelist, Margaret Atwood is also a flash fiction writer. I like the discipline of creating a complete story and finishing with precisely 100 words.

badge-and-gun

Here again is a crime drama in exactly 100 words.  Continue Reading →

This week’s mystery flash fiction

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Today’s crime flash fiction is perhaps striking the limits of how complex a story you can adequately tell in exactly 100 words. Wish I had maybe ten more, but nevertheless, it works.

Porsche-in-lot

One Jump Ahead of the Police

 Finally got a collar on that car theft ring?”

“Think so, lieutenant.  Suspect’s in interrogation.” 

“How’d you nab him, Burnside?”

“We staked out a stolen Porsche.  Thieves took it but parked it two miles away.  They do that when they think a car might have a LoJack tracking device.”

“They let it sit to see if we show up,” the lieutenant said ,  “then pick it up when they think it’s clear.”

 Burnside nodded.  “Smart, but we’re smarter.”

“Bad news,” said another detective entering Burnside’s office.  “Guy we arrested was homeless.  Got paid fifty bucks to drive it to another location.”

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Continue Reading →

Today’s crime flash fiction

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A fixed, 100-word length is a challenge. This story arrived in my head almost fully formed, but when I’d written it, I knew it could have only one title.

 

‘B’ Movie Plot

 Dashing off the curb, the teenager ripped open the car door and jumped into the passenger seat. He aimed a small caliber semi-automatic at the driver.

Al Marino was unperturbed.  “Jacking cars, kid?  That’s no way to make a living.  Know who I am?  I could use someone like you.”

“Pull around the corner,” the young man said.

“Sure, kid.” Marino turned the luxury sedan and stopped.   “You’re making a mistake.”

“No mistake. I ain’t no ‘jacker. This is for my sister you got hooked on smack. Now she’s a ’ho’.”

Marino thought the kid wouldn’t shoot.

He was wrong.

Noir-street-scene

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